COVID-19 Information & FAQs

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Symptoms

Reported illnesses range from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed COVID-19 cases. Symptoms of COVID-19 may include any of the following: fever (>100.4), dry cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, chills, decreased appetite, diminished sense of taste or smell, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, muscle/joint aches, nausea, rash, rigors, runny nose, sore throat, or sputum production. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.

graphic of thermometer

FEVER > 100.4

graphic of person coughing

DRY COUGH

graphic of lungs

SHORTNESS OF BREATH

If you develop any new symptoms, even mild ones, stay home and call a healthcare provider or the COVID-19 Screening Hotline to arrange testing. The COVID-19 Screening Hotline number, 586-6000, is available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include, but are not limited to, trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, and bluish lips or face.

Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning. Call your doctor if you develop symptoms and have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, or have recently traveled from an area with widespread/ongoing community spread of COVID-19.

Flatten the Curve

“Flatten the curve” means to avoid a huge spike of infections in a short period of time and instead, stretch – or flatten – the number of infections over a longer time period. By slowing the transmission we can have fewer people ill at the same time and avoid overwhelming Juneau’s healthcare system.

Graphic with two infection rate graphs, one showing trajectory without intervention (higher spike in shorter time) and one with intervention (lower spike spread out over a longer period).

What You Can Do to Prevent Illness

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying chronic medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness.

Please consult with your health care provider about additional steps you may be able to take to protect yourself.

Take Steps to Protect Yourself and Others

Wash hands often.

Clean Hands Often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Avoid close contact

Avoid Close Contact

Stay home if sick.

Stay Home if Sick

  • Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care.
  • Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you feel worse or you think it is an emergency.
  • Avoid public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
Cover coughs and sneezes.

Cover Coughs & Sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
Avoid touching your face.

Avoid Touching Face

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. Complete disinfection guidance can be found here

Frequently Asked Questions

A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold. A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

Symptoms of COVID-19 include any of the following: fever (>100.4), dry cough, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, chills, decreased appetite, diminished sense of taste or smell, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, muscle/joint aches, nausea, rash, rigors, runny nose, sore throat, or phlegm production.

If you are fully vaccinated, CBJ no longer requires masks be worn in most indoor or outdoor settings. Masks must be worn by those who are not yet fully vaccinated in indoor public areas and outdoor crowded events. CBJ has revised the COVID-19 Mitigation Strategies to reflect CDC guidance on masks. Fully vaccinated is defined as two weeks after your final dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. ​

Everyone – regardless of vaccination status – must continue to wear a mask on Capital Transit, in the Juneau International Airport, Juneau School District facilities, Bartlett Regional Hospital, and in any local business, workplace, healthcare, or other setting that still requires it.​

CBJ currently follows the State of Alaska’s guidelines for in- and out-of-state travel. If you are fully vaccinated, you are not required to test or practice strict social-distancing once you arrive in Juneau. If you are not fully vaccinated, you are strongly encouraged to test upon arrival to Juneau, or obtain a negative test result 72 hours prior to landing in Juneau. Arrival testing at the Juneau International Airport is free.

Please refer to the State of Alaska’s COVID-19 Traveler Information webpage for the latest information, requirements, and advisories.

If you think you might have COVID-19, stay home except to get medical care. If you have any symptoms of COVID-19 – even if you are vaccinated – call your primary healthcare provider or the COVID-19 Screening Hotline at 586-6000, or register for a test online. The hotline is available daily from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. If you call the hotline, testing will be arranged if appropriate at the Drive-Thru Testing Site.

While COVID-19 seems to more heavily affect people who are older and with pre-existing medical conditions, young and healthy people have also had serious side effects and died from the disease. COVID-19 is 10 times more deadly than the seasonal flu and was the third leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2020. And for those who had mild or asymptomatic cases, COVID-19 has a wide range of other long-lasting symptoms. These include fatigue, brain fog, joint pain, hair loss, organ damage, and erectile dysfunction.

They are both terms we’re hearing a lot about as COVID-19 spreads, and they mean very different things. Isolation and quarantine are methods used to protect the public by preventing exposure to infected persons or to persons who may be infected.

  • Isolation – separates sick people from people who are not sick.
  • Quarantine –separates and restricts movements of people who may have been exposed to a contagious disease to see if they become sick.

If you are sick, you will be asked to self-isolate, most likely at your home if you are not seriously ill and can separate yourself from other family members. If you have had contact with known case or have traveled to an area where there is COVID-19 spread but are not yet showing symptoms, you may be asked to quarantine at home for a period of time to determine if you will become ill.

COVID-19 Glossary

For more helpful information about COVID-19, please refer to CDC’s Frequently Asked Questions, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) website, and Bartlett Regional Hospital’s COVID-19 page..

CDC COVID-19 FAQS
DHSS Covid-19 Page
BRH COVID-19 PAGE
Have a non-clinical question about COVID-19? Call 2-1-1. Alaska 211 can help the public with questions about COVID-19 and refer callers to appropriate resources.

Have a non-clinical question about COVID-19? Call 2-1-1. Alaska 211 can help the public with questions about COVID-19 and refer callers to appropriate resources.

John Hopkins CSSE Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases Map